NETCAPP

Resources

Welcome to NETCAPP’s resources section. Here you will find a number of free resources organized by the following topics:

General Information of Science-Based Approaches

Selecting a Science-Based Approach
Focus Groups
Coalition Building
Community Needs Assessments

Implementing a Science-Based Approach
Working with Parents
Information to Share with Parents
Involving the Community
Involving Educators and Schools
Program Sustainability

Evaluating a Science-Based Approach
Lessons Learned and Case Studies
Evaluation Resources and Tools

Other Teen Pregnancy Prevention Materials and Information
Advocacy Resources
Information for Youth
Educator Resources
Working with Young Men
Teen Pregnancy Data


If you are in need of SBA resources not listed, or if you have a document you would like included on this page, please contact us.


General Information

“Emerging Answers: New Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy” (Summary Report, May 2001) is a publication that offers practitioners and policymakers information on what programs work to prevent teen pregnancy. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/data/pdf/emeranswsum.pdf

“No Easy Answers: Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy” (Summary Report, March 1997) is the precursor to Emerging Answers, this 1997 comprehensive research review finds "there are no magic bullets" for preventing teen pregnancy. Prevention programs that address the complex reasons that teens become pregnant show the most promise for significantly reducing teen pregnancy and birth rates.
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/data/report_summaries/no_easy_answers/default.asp

“What Works: Curriculum-Based Programs That Prevent Teen Pregnancy” is a 19-page pamphlet that presents a succinct overview of what is known about carefully evaluated interventions that help prevent teen pregnancy, including a list of effective programs, selected program effects, contact information, as well as direct links to resources providing additional program and evaluation information. The pamphlet offers advice on how to choose a program, catalogs the characteristics of effective programs, and offers some words of caution about what an effective program actually can accomplish. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/reading/pdf/What_Works.pdf

Advocates for Youth developed a series of publications titled “Communities Responding to the Challenge of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention.” The five volumes include information on mobilization; needs and assets assessments; implementing effective programs; evaluating teen pregnancy prevention programs; assessing youth’s access to reproductive health services; and linking youth development programs with teen pregnancy prevention.
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/PUBLICATIONS/catalog.htm#invcomm

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, developed “Get Organized: A Guide to Preventing Teen Pregnancy,” a practical manual for people who are interested in taking action to prevent teen pregnancy in their communities. The three-volume, 17-chapter publication covers a lot of ground - from strategies for involving boys and men and for reaching out to religious leaders to practical advice about how to raise money and to conduct program evaluation. Yet it remains easy to read and simple to use, with many checklists and examples from promising programs around the country.
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/research/getorganized/default.asp

Putting What Works to Work (PWWTW) is a project of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy funded, in part, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Through PWWTW, the Campaign will translate research on teen pregnancy prevention and related issues into user-friendly materials for practitioners, policymakers, and advocates.
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/works/default.asp

Emerging Answers 2007: New Research Findings on Programs to Reduce Teen Pregnancy - Full Report (2007) by Douglas Kirby, Ph.D.
This comprehensive review of evaluation research offers practitioners and policymakers reviews research on a wide range of programs, including curriculum-based sexuality and abstinence education for teens and pre-teens, sex education for parents, contraceptive and family planning clinics and programs, early childhood programs, youth development and service learning programs, and community-based, multiple-component initiatives.
http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/ea2007/


Selecting a SBA

In the “Science & Success” series, Advocates for Youth identifies evaluated programs that have been proven to reduce teenage pregnancies and/or sexually transmitted infections (STIs) or to cause at least two beneficial changes in sexual risk behaviors.
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/programsthatwork/index.htm

Putting What Works to Work (PWWTW) is a project of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy funded, in part, by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Through PWWTW, the Campaign will translate research on teen pregnancy prevention and related issues into user-friendly materials for practitioners, policymakers, and advocates.
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/works/default.asp

“What Works” is a 19-page pamphlet from the National Campaign, which examines what is known about carefully evaluated interventions that help prevent teen pregnancy. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/reading/pdf/What_Works.pdf

Presented by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, these papers and tables provide an exhaustive analysis of the more than 400 factors that can affect teen sexual behavior in both the United States and in developing countries.
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/works/risk_protective_kirby/default.asp

Developed by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, “Making the List” helps those working with young people to navigate lists of effective teen pregnancy prevention programs and make informed decisions about how to select the best one(s) for a particular community and population. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/works/pdf/MakingTheList.pdf


Focus Groups

This is a free online course developed by ETR on focus group basics. It covers everything from site logistics to data analysis.
http://www.ccfc.ca.gov/ffn/FGcourse/focusGroupCourse.html

A step-by-step guide on working with the media to promote teen pregnancy prevention, which includes a sample focus group discussion guide, developed by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (pdf).
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/research/getorganized/ch15.pdf

The Free Management Library’s webpage on conducting focus groups
http://www.managementhelp.org/grp_skll/focusgrp/focusgrp.htm

A website with tips on conducting focus groups by the Market Navigation, Inc.
http://www.mnav.com/qualitative_research.htm

The Community Toolbox provides over 6,000 pages of practical skill-building information on over 250 different topics. Topic sections include step-by-step instruction, examples, check-lists, and related resources.
http://ctb.ku.edu/index.jsp

A guide to conducting focus groups with youth, including sample questions developed by the Canadian Forces Personnel Support Agency to help support children in military families (pdf).
http://www.cfpsa.com/en/psp/youth/resources/focusGroupQuestions_e.pdf

This site from Penn State provides a guide to developing questions for focus groups.
http://www.extension.psu.edu/evaluation/Questions.html

ETR provides guidelines on conducting focus groups with teens.
http://www.etr.org/recapp/theories/ProgramEvaluation/FGGuidelines.htm

ETR's sample protocol for focus groups with parents.
http://www.etr.org/recapp/theories/ProgramEvaluation/FGProtocolParents.htm

ETR's sample protocol for focus groups with teens.
http://www.etr.org/recapp/theories/ProgramEvaluation/FGProtocolTeens.htm

Coalition Building

Advocates for Youth developed a series of publications titled “Communities Responding to the Challenge of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention.” The first of five volumes, “Mobilizing for Action” reviews research on adolescent pregnancy; describes how to build coalitions; outlines steps for planning and conducting pregnancy prevention campaigns; and provides tips for working with the media, policy makers, and other key stakeholders. (pdf)
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/PUBLICATIONS/communitiesresponding1.pdf

The Community “How To” Guides on Underage Drinking Prevention, developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, contains a chapter on coalition building, which details the process of developing and maintaining a community coalition. http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/alcohol/Community%20Guides%20HTML/Guides_index.html

The Free Management Library’s webpage on developing “communities of practice”.
http://www.managementhelp.org/grp_skll/cop.htm

Community Needs Assessments

A step-by-step guide on conducting a community needs assessment on teen pregnancy developed by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy (pdf).
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/research/getorganized/ch12.pdf

Advocates for Youth developed a series of publications titled “Communities Responding to the Challenge of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention.” The second of five volumes, “Building Strong Foundations, Ensuring the Future” provides step-by-step guidance on assessing the needs and assets of youth in the community, developing a strong funding base for programs, and planning for the evaluation of pregnancy prevention programs. (pdf)
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/PUBLICATIONS/communitiesresponding2.pdf

Presented by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, these papers and tables provide an exhaustive analysis of the more than 400 factors that can affect teen sexual behavior in both the United States and in developing countries.
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/works/risk_protective_kirby/default.asp

Developed by Iowa State University, this document provides a general overview of community assessment and the steps needed to complete one (pdf).
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Publications/CRD334.pdf

The Community Toolbox provides over 6,000 pages of practical skill-building information on over 250 different topics. Topic sections include step-by-step instruction, examples, check-lists, and related resources.
http://ctb.ku.edu/index.jsp

The Community Guide to Helping America’s Youth helps communities build partnerships, assess their needs and resources, and select from program designs that could be replicated in their community. It walks community groups through the steps necessary for building strong supports for youth.
http://guide.helpingamericasyouth.gov

Developed by the National Youth Gang Center, the assessment guide, A Guide to Assessing Your Community’s Youth Gang Problem, provides a blueprint for conducting an in-depth assessment of the gang problem in the community and guidance for the assessment process. It describes the data variables, sources of data, and data-collection instruments. It also provides suggestions on how to organize and analyze the data and guidelines for preparation of an Assessment Report that will present the results of the data-collection effort, as well as an analysis of the data and key findings regarding the community’s gang problem.
http://www.iir.com/nygc/acgp/assessment.htm

The Community “How To” Guides on Underage Drinking Prevention, developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, contains a chapter on community needs assessment, which details the elements of a needs assessment. Beginning with data, the booklet walks the reader through the process organizations must follow to obtain all the information they will need to determine the exact causes of underage drinking and the appropriate solutions to those problems.
http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/alcohol/Community%20Guides%20HTML/Guides_index.html


Implementing a Science-Based Approach

Copy That, by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, makes clear that a key step to lowering teen pregnancy rates further is to extend the reach of teen pregnancy prevention programs that have been shown to have positive results. Replicating programs proven to work is an important strategy to continuing recent progress. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/reading/pdf/Copy_That.pdf


Working with Parents

The National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy developed “Terms of Engagement: How to Involve Parents in Programs to Prevent Teen Pregnancy”. The publication features information on reaching parents; motivating parents to participate and keeping them involved; knowing what to say to parents and how to say it; and paying for programs. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/reading/pdf/terms_engagement2006.pdf

This chapter in the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy’s document “Get Organized,” is dedicated to involving parents and other adults in teen pregnancy prevention programs. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/research/getorganized/ch06.pdf

Advocates for Youth develops many useful documents for parents looking for information on speaking with their child about sexuality as well as organizing their community to prevent teen pregnancy.
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/parents/index.htm


Information to Share with Parents

Advocates for Youth develops many useful documents for parents looking for information on speaking with their child about sexuality as well as organizing their community to prevent teen pregnancy.
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/parents/index.htm

This site for parents, created by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, provides information on discussing teen pregnancy with their child.
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/parent/default.asp


Involving the Community

Advocates for Youth developed a series of publications titled “Communities Responding to the Challenge of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention.” The first of five volumes, “Mobilizing for Action” reviews research on adolescent pregnancy; describes how to build coalitions; outlines steps for planning and conducting pregnancy prevention campaigns; and provides tips for working with the media, policy makers, and other key stakeholders. (pdf)
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/communitiesresponding1.pdf

Advocates for Youth created a list of resources and materials to help in building local coalitions to prevent teen pregnancy. Resources include organizations, publications and websites.
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/frtp/localcoalitions.htm

This chapter in the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy’s document “Get Organized,” is dedicated to involving community healthcare providers in teen pregnancy prevention programs. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/research/getorganized/ch10.pdf

This chapter in the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy’s document “Get Organized,” is dedicated to involving the local business community in teen pregnancy prevention programs. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/research/getorganized/ch08.pdf

From Advocates for Youth-Hot Potatoes: Keeping Cool in the Midst of Controversy: As teen pregnancy prevention program planners, administrators, and advocates, you often find yourself in the midst of conflict and controversy. The issues are serious - teen sexual risk-taking, unintended pregnancy, and STIs, including HIV- and can trigger deeply-held values that cause intense disagreement. Wisdom, preparation, and practice can help handle difficult situations appropriately. This document offers a number of suggestions and provides commonly- asked questions to help prepare for the 'hot potatoes' of controversy.
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/sos/keepingcool.htm


Involving Educators and Schools

This chapter in the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy’s document “Get Organized,” is dedicated to involving schools in teen pregnancy prevention programs. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/research/getorganized/ch09.pdf

Advocates for Youth developed a series of publications titled “Communities Responding to the Challenge of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention.” The first of five volumes, “Mobilizing for Action” reviews research on adolescent pregnancy; describes how to build coalitions; outlines steps for planning and conducting pregnancy prevention campaigns; and provides tips for working with the media, policy makers, and other key stakeholders. (pdf)
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/communitiesresponding1.pdf

Advocates for Youth developed a series of publications titled “Communities Responding to the Challenge of Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention.” The last of five volumes, “Linking Pregnancy prevention to Youth Development” demonstrates the benefits that youth development programs may derive from providing links to sexuality education and contraceptive access programs. (pdf)
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/communitiesresponding5.pdf


Program Sustainability

From Research to Practice: Approaching Foundations, Advocates for Youth (pdf)
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/frtp/foundations.pdf

From Research to Practice: Cultivating Individual Donors, Advocates for Youth (pdf)
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/frtp/indivdonors.pdf

From Research to Practice: Ensuring Financial Stability: Selected Annotated Bibliography, Advocates for Youth (pdf)
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/frtp/financial.pdf

From Research to Practice: Fund-raising Tips for Local Organizations, Advocates for Youth (pdf)
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/frtp/fundraisingtips.pdf

From Research to Practice: The Heart of Fund-raising, Advocates for Youth (pdf)
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/frtp/fundraising.pdf

The Community “How To” Guides on Underage Drinking Prevention, developed by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, contains a chapter on coalition building, which details the various types of funding that are available including government grants, private sector funding, in-kind contributions, and funding that can be obtained from earmarked funds such as fees, fines, assessments, and dedicated taxes. Because most organizations have difficulty writing a proposal that can help them obtain needed funding, Appendix #1 in this booklet includes a "Proposal Writing Short Course," provided by the Foundation Center. A proposal checklist and evaluation form will also assist the organization in reviewing the final product. http://www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/alcohol/Community%20Guides%20HTML/Guides_index.html


Evaluating Science-Based Approaches

Copy That, by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, makes clear that a key step to lowering teen pregnancy rates further is to extend the reach of teen pregnancy prevention programs that have been shown to have positive results. Replicating programs proven to work is an important strategy to continuing recent progress. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/reading/pdf/Copy_That.pdf

The Free Management Library has an extensive chapter on Basic Program Evaluation as well as a chapter on Outcome Evaluation for Non-Profit Organizations.
http://www.managementhelp.org/evaluatn/fnl_eval.htm

This site developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention links to numerous step-by-step evaluation resources, especially those regarding development and use of logic models.
http://www.cdc.gov/eval/resources.htm#logic%20model

The University of Wisconsin has created a website of program development and evaluation, which provides information from a number of sources.
http://www.uwex.edu/ces/pdande/evaluation/

The James Irvine Foundation has a list of resources available for download, a number of which look directly at evaluating programs run by non-profit groups.
http://www.irvine.org/evaluation/resources.shtml


Evaluation Resources and Tools

This site by the CDC provides an introduction to program evaluation.
http://www.cdc.gov/eval/framework.htm

This site from Penn State provides detailed information on each step of program evaluation.
http://www.extension.psu.edu/evaluation/category.html


Lessons Learned and Case Studies

This is an example of a thorough needs assessment report done in Ontario, Canada. The Best Start Resource Centre is funded by the Ontario government to support service providers in addressing preconception, prenatal and child health. Best Start develops new resources and provides networking, training and consultation opportunities for service providers. The focus of Best Start’s work conforms to the changing needs and interests of Ontario service providers. With increasing attention to issue of teen pregnancy, Best Start chose to investigate the needs of Ontario service providers in the area of teen pregnancy prevention. (pdf)
http://www.beststart.org/research/TPPNAresults.pdf


Other Teen Pregnancy Prevention Materials and Information


Teen Pregnancy Prevention Advocacy Materials

Adolescent Childbearing and Educational and Economic Attainment, Advocates for Youth
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/factsheet/fsadlchd.htm

Adolescent Pregnancy and Childbearing in the United States, Advocates for Youth
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/factsheet/fsprechd.htm

Adolescent Protective Behaviors: Abstinence and Contraceptive Use, Advocates for Youth
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/factsheet/fsprotective.htm

Adolescent Sexual Health in Europe and the U.S.—Why the Difference?, Advocates for Youth
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/factsheet/fsest.htm

Pregnancy and Childbearing Among Younger Teens, Advocates for Youth
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/publications/factsheet/fsyoungerteens.htm

Information for Professionals Working on Teen Pregnancy Prevention, National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/professional/default.asp

Information for Policymakers Working on Teen Pregnancy Prevention, National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/policy/

CDC has released a new Teen Pregnancy Factsheet to be used with policymakers and is available in English and Spanish. About one-third of girls in the US get pregnant before age 20. In 2006, a total of 435,427 infants were born to mothers aged 15-19 years. More than 80% of these births were unintended, meaning they occurred sooner than desired or were not wanted at any time. In the US, rates for pregnancy, birth, STD, and abortion among teenagers are considerably higher than rates in Canada, England, France, Ireland, the Netherlands, Sweden, Japan, and most other developed countries.
http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/AdolescentReproHealth/index.htm


Information for Youth

Parents as Advocates for Comprehensive Sex Ed in Schools, Advocates for Youth
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/parents/advocate.htm

Information and resources for teens developed by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/teen/default.asp

The YouthResource is a project of Advocates for Youth; the website was developed for GLBTQ youth to answer questions, provide information, and allow a space for sharing experiences.
http://www.youthresource.com

Similar to Advocates for Youth’s YouthResource, AmbienteJoven is a website developed for Spanish-speaking GLBTQ youth to answer questions, provide information, and allow a space for sharing experiences.
http://www.ambientejoven.org

MySistahs a project of Advocates for Youth that is a website created by and for young women of color to provide information and offer support on sexual and reproductive health issues through education and advocacy. Through monthly features, message boards, and online peer education young women receive information on activism, culture, sexual health, and other issues that are important to them.
http://www.mysistahs.org

Go Ask Alice! is the health question and answer Internet service produced by Alice!, Columbia University's Health Promotion Program — a division of Health Services at Columbia.
http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu

Sex, Etc. is a website for teens developed by Answer. Answer is based at the Rutgers University Center for Applied Psychology and has provided resources, advocacy, training and technical assistance in support of age-appropriate, balanced, comprehensive sexuality education, first in New Jersey and now nationwide. (Answer was known to most people as the Network for Family Life Education for over 25 years.)
http://www.sexetc.org

teenwire.com is an award-winning sexual health Web site for teens by the Planned Parenthood Federation of America.
http://www.teenwire.com


Educator Resources

The “Science Says” series, created by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, discuss a number of issues surrounding teen pregnancy in simple briefs focused on current research in the field.
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/works/sciencesays.asp

This site, created by Advocates for Youth, contains a number of documents on working with GLBTQ students, as well as materials for GLBTQ youth and their peers.
http://www.advocatesforyouth.org/glbtq.htm

The YouthResource is a project of Advocates for Youth; the website was developed for GLBTQ youth to answer questions, provide information, and allow a space for sharing experiences.
http://www.youthresource.com

Similar to Advocates for Youth’s YouthResource, AmbienteJoven is a website developed for Spanish-speaking GLBTQ youth to answer questions, provide information, and allow a space for sharing experiences.
http://www.ambientejoven.org

Opportunity Knocks: Using Teachable Moments to Convey Safer Sex Messages to Young People-
With accurate information and adequate support, young people can make healthy and responsible decisions about having sex and using contraception. Adults can be most effective by providing the information and support needed to promote responsible decision-making in youth and help ensure transition to adulthood is safe and healthy.
http://www.healthyteennetwork.org/vertical/Sites/{B4D0CC76-CF78-4784-BA7C-5D0436F6040C}/uploads/{395EFC0E-9B15-47A0-8EA7-83FA7069D010}.PDF


Working with Young Men

The importance of targeting teen boys and young men is increasingly apparent to researchers, practitioners, parents, and others who work with youth. This publication, “It’s a Guy Thing: Boys, Young Men, and Teen Pregnancy Prevention,” developed by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, addresses the role of boys and young men in teen pregnancy. (pdf)
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/resources/reading/males.asp

Men in the United States: Unplanned Pregnancy, Sexual Activity, and Contraceptive Use
This fact sheet provides key data about unplanned pregnancy from the male perspective, with information by age, race/ethnicity, and living arrangement.  It also provides data about men's sexual activity, contraceptive use, and relationship status at the birth of their first child. (pdf)
http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/fast-facts-men-in-the-united-states.pdf


State-Specific Data

This section of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy’s website provides a wealth state information, including trend data, state profiles, state-by-state comparisons, summaries of state teen pregnancy prevention programs, some county and city data, media campaigns and legislative activity, as well as state contact information and related links.
http://www.teenpregnancy.org/america/default.asp

Developed by the Kaiser Family Foundation, statehealthfacts.org contains data for each of the fifty states for numerous health indicators.
http://www.statehealthfacts.org/cgi-bin/healthfacts.cgi

Science Says #35 from Advocates for Youth examines in detail the relationship between Latino teens' sexual behavior and such measures as generational status, language, and country of origin.
http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/pdf/SS/SS35_Acculturation.pdf

From the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy: The DCR Report (Data, Charts, Research) provides in depth answers to some critical questions about unplanned pregnancy.   At present, the report is divided into three sections, unplanned pregnancy among all women, unplanned pregnancy among unmarried 20-somethings, and resolution of unplanned pregnancy.  New sections with be added to the DCR Report from time to time and readers are encouraged to check back often on this ever-evolving set of data.
http://www.thenationalcampaign.org/resources/dcr/


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